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Preservation Destination

PRESERVATION DESTINATION DAVENPORT
OCTOBER 18-19, 2015

The Iowa Conservation and Preservation Consortium (ICPC) would like to invite you to a free event planned for all of its members, Preservation Destination in Davenport on October 18 and October 19!    We will be touring and seeing firsthand four locations in the Davenport area where preservation is done on a daily basis.  Rare behind the scenes tours will be available on October 18 and October 19.  Participants are encouraged to attend one or both of the days.

If you are not a member, you can join ahead and then be eligible for a potential Fellowship of $100 to help cover transportation and housing costs.  You also can join on the day of Preservation Destination.

What we need from you:

Please email ICPC Board Member Onnica Marquez to sign up —  MarquezOnnicaF@sau.edu.

Please include two phone numbers (cell, work, home, etc.)in case we need to get in touch with you once you’ve started traveling.

Additional Information:

ICPC 2015 Preservation Destination Fellowship

Preservation Destination 2015 Schedule

Hotel Options for Preservation Destination in Davenport Area

Preservation Destination – 2015 Things to do in area

Please view the attachments above to find out more – details of what you might anticipate seeing at our host sites, hotel options, other things to do in the area, and an application for $100 to help with travel and accommodations.

Schedule:

Sunday Oct. 18

3:00 to 5:00 pm – Putnam Museum and Science Center

Monday Oct. 19

9:00 to 10:30 am – Davenport Public Library: Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center

10:30 am to noon – Figge Art Museum

1:30 to 3:00 pm – German American Heritage Center

Apply for a Scholarship

The Iowa Conservation and Preservation Consortium (ICPC) is offering two $500 reimbursement scholarships to the Campbell Center for Historic Preservation Studies in Mount Carroll, Illinois, or Northern States Conservation Center on-line classes, or to the Midwest Art Conservation Center in Minneapolis. Those eligible to apply are Iowa residents or college students in Iowa working or who have worked in a museum, historical society, library, archive, genealogical society library, government record office, or other institution that preserves the history and culture of Iowa.  

 

FILL OUT AN ONLINE APPLICATION HERE

Click here to download an application

Requirements: Eligible applicants are Iowa residents or college students in Iowa who are working or who have worked in a museum, historical society, library, archive, genealogical society library, government record office, or other institution that preserves the history and culture of Iowa. Eligible applicants must be an individual member of the ICPC, or from an organization that has an institutional membership with ICPC. Recipients are required to provide a report of their experience for the ICPC website and provide either a “tip sheet” or do a presentation at an upcoming SOS (Save our Stuff) or other educational opportunity for the ICPC membership.

Award: ICPC will award a $500 reimbursement scholarship. This simply means the successful applicant will pay for, take the class, and then turn in verification of their attendance to the ICPC in order to receive the reimbursement award.

Application Deadline FOR 2015: March 1

TO SEND IN VIA US MAIL OR

FILL OUT AN ONLINE APPLICATION HERE

Website Addresses:

Campbell Center – www.campbellcenter.org

Northern States Conservation Center – www.museumclasses.org

Midwest Art Conservation Center www.preserveart.org/

Application Deadline FOR 2015: March 1

Campbell Center Scholarship Reports

________________________________

NEH GRANT OPPORTUNITIES

 

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Reports From Scholarship Recipients

Taylor Manley, Buildings and Grounds Associate, 2013 Scholarship Winner

Course: Preservation Maintenance

Location: Campbell Center

Instructor: David Arbogast

Dates: June 20-21, 2013

Course Description: Although the field of historic preservation seems to be dominated by spasmodic restorations of buildings, the hard work consists of the regular, routine maintenance of these resources. This course has been developed to address those needs both in the short-term and in the long-term cycles. It is intended both for those actively engaged in maintenance and for those responsible for the management of the resources.

The instructor, David Arbogast, is an architectural conservator with over thirty years of experience in the field. He brings to the course a wealth of experience and knowledge both from the professional and from the occupational maintenance of historic resources.

Experience: At the Campbell Center, I took a class on Preservation Maintenance and it was great. The instructor and the staff were very handy with information. I also learned about budgeting for ongoing maintenance to help keep costs from sky rocketing and better preservation methods. We made a maintenance schedule as a class project, based off of Brucemore’s operations, which we will be adjusting and turning into our maintenance schedule at Brucemore. The importance of this class was:

  •  To keep Brucemore on the right path of scheduling maintenance and preservation concerns.

  •  To assign tasks to staff and figuring out what projects need to be contracted out.

  •  To look down the road for bigger projects that need to be budgeted for.

  •  To schedule projects sooner rather than later and can be done by Brucemore staff.

Collecting data and pictures are the most important source of condition assessment. Seeing the difference on paper of all the types of maintenance was eye opening. There are daily, weekly, seasonal, annual, and long-term maintenance tasks that we are now looking at. I think that every year we will be updating our maintenance schedule to continue looking down the road to make our preservation maintenance actions. I thank you for this opportunity. ~Taylor Manley

Sue Olson-Lee County, Iowa Historical Society, 2007 Scholarship Winner

With a scholarship from ICPC in August 2007, I was privileged to participate in and complete a course entitled  “Care of Photographic Collections” at the Campbell Center for Historic Preservation Studies in Mt. Carroll, Illinois. Identification of photo prints and negatives is essential to determining the preservation methods needed to keep this material in good condition. The deterioration of negatives is highly dependent on temperature and relative humidity. Most important is the identification of “Nitrate Negatives”. Nitrate film remained in production in various formats until the early 1950’s. The main disadvantage of nitrate film is that it is highly flammable and releases hazardous gases when it deteriorates. Large quantities of nitrate film in collections have caused several disastrous fires. While attempting to catalog Lee County Historical Society’s photographs and negatives, I noticed that there were differences of which I was ignorant. The course at the Campbell Center helped me identify these differences. The Campbell Center experience is one of comradeship and learning. The dorm rooms are neither heated or cooled, but fans and space heaters are available. Nourishing morning and noon meals and snacks are furnished by friendly staff . Of architectural interest are the many campus buildings and surrounding dwellings. There is also an excellent preservation, conservation library and computers available during “off” hours. Classes normally meet from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Evening meals are not provided but usually classmates find a local restaurant where they can eat and discuss the daily lessons. My instructor has come to Mt. Carroll for the past 15 years and is a leading expert in photographic conservation and preservation. It was an amazing opportunity to be able to learn from such a teacher. If you are interested in learning about preservation of historic (or precious to you) materials, there are many courses available through the Campbell Center. You can call (815-244-1173) or check out their catalog online -www.campbellcenter.org. Classes are limited to under 12 persons and are attended by curators of museums, collectors of antiques and regular persons. The instructors are internationally known experts in their respective fields. ~Sue Olson-Lee County, Iowa Historical Society

Bill Kreuger, Iowa Masonic Library and Museums. 2007 Scholarship Winner

In 2007 I was fortunate enough to win a scholarship from ICPC to attend the Campbell Center for Historic Preservation Studies in Mt. Carroll, Illinois. I was also able to win an additional $300 scholarship from the NEH in order to attend. The class I took was entitled “Emergency Preparedness, Response and Recovery” and was offered during mid-July.

The instructors for the course were Hilary Kaplan from the National Archives and Sharon Bennett from the Charleston Museum in South Carolina. Both had extensive backgrounds and training in emergency preparedness, response and recovery. Each had been involved with response and recovery efforts during Hurricane Katrina on the Gulf coast as well as other experiences in their own facilities and elsewhere. There were 11 attendees in the class from all over the country.

The class itself was 4 days long, the first day consisted of lectures while the remaining days were hands-on experiences in actually dealing with emergency response and recovery. The “graduation” consisted of actually dealing with a real-life emergency situation when the class found that various artifacts and materials had been left outside on the quad all night and exposed to water damage from a nearby sprinkler.

The ICPC scholarship program is a wonderful opportunity to take advantage of in-depth, state of the art preservation programs at little cost for your institution. The application process takes just a short amount of time. Room fees and most of your board fees are included in the cost of the class. The only meal not covered is the evening meal and often class members got together and went out to local restaurants or purchased items and grilled out on the patio. The breakfasts and lunches provided by the Campbell Center were delicious and filling. Snacks were also available during the day.

As a result of my experience at the Campbell Center, I was able to complete work on an emergency preparedness plan for the Iowa Masonic Library and Museums. This is a project that I had wanted to do for quite some time.~Bill Kreuger Assistant Librarian Iowa Masonic Library and Museums librarian @ gl-iowa.org

Susan Kuecker, Curator of the African American Historical Museum and Cultural Center of Iowa in Cedar Rapids, 2006 scholarship winner.

In 2006 I won an ICPC scholarship to take a class in proper preservation and exhibit techniques for textiles at the Campbell Center for Historic Preservation Studies in Mount Carroll, Illinois. I took the class in August 2006 and found it a fantastic experience. I met wonderful people from all over the country and learned what they were doing in their institutions. The instructor was terrific and very practical. I came back to the African American Historical Museum and Cultural Center of Iowa and made a number of changes with help from a grant that I had recieved. This is a terrific opportunity to obtain state of the art training at little or no costs to your institutions. Mount Carroll, Illinois is located just northeast of Clinton, Iowa and is within easy driving distance for most of us. Room and board is included in the cost of the courses and The Campbell Center offers an additional $300 scholarship from NEH for most courses. The scholarship application takes just a few minutes. Without this opportunity my institution simply could not have afforded to send me. I would have still re-organized the textile section and not done nearly as good a job in improving preservation as what I was able to do because of the course.

SOS (Save our Stuff) Conference

Every year, the Iowa Conservation and Preservation Consortium holds its annual meeting in conjunction with its Save Our Stuff (S.O.S.) conference.

Preserving and conserving Iowa’s cultural heritage is a pillar in the missions of many institutions around the state. However, the monumental task of determining what projects take priority is difficult.  This year’s ICPC Save Our Stuff conference is focused on Preservation Priorities, examining strategies and practices that meet the preservation needs of Iowa’s cultural institutions.

Check back to keep up-to-date on 2016 Conference!

Preservation Tip Sheets

ICPC Tip Sheet List

The Iowa Conservation and Preservation Consortium (ICPC) has developed several tip sheets to assist in the care and preservation of documents and artifacts.

Audio Tapes Tip Sheet

Precious Documents Tip Sheet

CD-DVD Tip sheet

Creating Enclosures Tip Sheet

Photograph Tip Sheet

Time Capsules Tip Sheet

Drying Materials Tip Sheet

Preserving Scrapbooks Tip Sheet

Creating an Archival Scrapbook or Photo Album Tip Sheet

Packing and Shipping Museum Objects

Preservation Maintenance Tip Sheet

Educational Opportunities And Readings

NEDCC online paper preservation course (includes archives and photographs): Preservation 101
This is a series of 8 lessons, each with a set of “self-testing” questions, assignments, paper and online resources.

NEDCC Preservation Leaflets http://www.nedcc.org/resources/leaflets.list.php

Video Fact Sheets from the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA). Access to technical Reports and other publications by the Canadian Conservation Institute

CCI Preservation Framework
http://www.cci-icc.gc.ca/tools/framework/index_e.aspx

Flood Recovery Booklet http://hosted.lib.uiowa.edu/flood/

Pocket Response Plan http://www.statearchivists.org/prepare/framework/prep.htm

A Selective Preservation Bibliography

Preservation Tip Sheets 

 The Evidence in Hand: Report of the Task Force on the Artifact in Library Collections by Stephen G. Nichols and Abby Smith, CLIR, November 2001

Long Term Access to E-Journals by Deanna B. Marcum. CLIR Issues, no. 12 November/December 1999.
Digital Archiving: What We Preserve, Not How by Deanna B. Marcum. CLIR Issues, no. 13, January/February 2000.
The Digital Library and B2B Services by Daniel Greenstein. CLIR Issues, no. 17, September/October 2000
Preventive Measures: All the Print That’s Fit to Save, by Abby Smith. CLIR Issues, no. 16 July/August 2000
 

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Scholarships

The Iowa Conservation and Preservation Consortium (ICPC) is offers two $500 reimbursement scholarships to the Campbell Center for Historic Preservation Studies in Mount Carroll, Illinois, or Northern States Conservation Center on-line classes, or to the Midwest Art Conservation Center in Minneapolis. Those eligible to apply are Iowa residents or college students in Iowa working or who have worked in a museum, historical society, library, archive, genealogical society library, government record office, or other institution that preserves the history and culture of Iowa.

Eligible applicants must be an individual member of the ICPC, or from an organization that has an institutional membership with ICPC. The scholarship winners must demonstrate that the classes taken will be utilized within the state of Iowa. Each winner is expected to provide either a tip sheet or a presentation at a future ICPC event.

To apply, visit our Apply for a Scholarship page

Initiate, encourage & enhance preservation practices for Iowa archives & collections